Business English SLANG, IDIOMS & ABBREVIATIONS | Business English Course Lesson 7

Business English SLANG, IDIOMS & ABBREVIATIONS | Business English Course Lesson 7


– Hello everyone and welcome
back to English With Lucy. In this lesson, we’re
going to talk about slang, abbreviations and idioms. I don’t recommend that
you use these in your CV cover letter or interview. But it’s important that
you understand them and are prepared to use
them if the company culture seems modern and relaxed. Today I’m going to show you
10 slang e-mail abbreviations, 10 financial abbreviations and then six marketing abbreviations. After that, we’ll discuss
10 business idioms. (upbeat music) Let’s begin with 10 slang
e-mail abbreviations. Number one, TBH or LBH. These mean to be honest
or let’s be honest. To be honest, let’s be honest. Let’s be honest, the website
is in need of an overhaul. Number two, NBD, no big deal. No big deal. He can’t come to the meeting
but it’s no big deal. Number three V, this just means very. I’m very interested in
this business opportunity. Number four is def which means definitely. He’s def not attending the meeting. Number five, NSFW or SFW. These mean not safe for
work, not safe for work. Or safe for work, safe for work. For example, this attachment
is not safe for work, open it when you are out of the office. Number six, FYI, for your information. For your information. Now this one we do actually
say in real life as FYI. You’ll hardly hear anyone
saying for your information. An example, FYI, I overheard that Claire is getting a promotion. Number seven is ONW, on my way, on my way. For example, my train was late this morning but I’m on my way. Number eight, OOO, this
means out of office. Out of office. For example, I’m going to be
out of office all of next week. Number nine, LMK, let me know. Let me know. Let me know if you’ll be able to make it to the office party. Number 10 is BRB, be
right back, be right back. I have to shoot off
somewhere, I’ll be right back. In this part of the lesson,
I’m going to discuss with you 10 financial abbreviations. These aren’t slang as
such so you can use them in more formal e-mails. Number one is FIFO, first in, first out. First in, first out. This has to do with inventory. It’s basically saying when something is bought first, it’s used first. Number two, LIFO, this
means last in first out. This is the opposite of the previous where the last item bought
is the first item used. Number three ROI, return on investment. Return on investment, your
return on investment is the calculation of how much money the company is making compared to how
much money it’s spending. Number four, Q1, this
means the first quarter. You can also have Q2, Q3, and Q4. Each financial year is typically
divided into four quarters. Number five, YTD or MTD. These mean year to date or month to date. For example, the year to date return on the stock is eight percent. Number six, one of my favourites
actually is called TL;DR. This means too long; didn’t read. If somebody sends you a really long e-mail and you don’t have time to
read it, you can say TL;DR. TL;DR, it was too long, I didn’t read it. Send me something shorter. Number seven is ETA, the
estimated time of arrival. For example, what’s
the ETA on that report? Number eight is EOD meaning end of day. For example, I need that on my
desk by end of day tomorrow. Number nine is FTE meaning
full-time employee. For example, Lucy is a full-time employee. And number 10, our last
financial abbreviation is PTO, meaning paid time off. For example, please submit
your PTO requests by Monday. Now in this part of the lesson,
I’m going to talk to you about 10 marketing related abbreviations. Like the financial
abbreviations, these are slightly more formal and you can
use them in e-mails. Number one, B2B, B2B, this
means business to business. Number two, B2C, B2C, this
means business to customer. Number three is SEO, SEO, this means search engine optimization. This means creating and
structuring the content of your website so that it’s more likely to show up high in search results when certain keywords and
phrases are searched for. Number four, CR, conversion rate. Conversion rate, the percentage of people that convert into paying customers. Number five CPC or cost per click. This is your acquisition cost from a paid online advertising channel. It’s how much it cost to get
somebody to click on your ad. Number six, CTA, this
means a call to action. This is the part at the
end, usually at the end of a blog post, e-mail, or sales page that tells you to do something. For example, subscribe
to English with Lucy, that’s a really good CTA. In this part of the
lesson, I’m going to talk to you about 10 business idioms. These are slang expressions
that you might hear in the workplace or read in
e-mails, let’s get started. Number one, “at the eleventh hour”. this means “at the last minute”. For example, he submitted the
file at the eleventh hour. Number two is “to get the ball rolling”. This means “to start” or “to get started”. For example, let’s get the
ball rolling on this project. Number three is “to
think outside the box”. This means “to think differently”. For example, I really
think we need to think outside the box for this campaign. Number four, “to touch base”. This means “to speak”. For example, I’m going to touch base with the Regional Manager
and see where he’s at. Number five is “to circle back”
which means “to meet again”. For example, tomorrow
I’m going to circle back and see how she’s getting on. Number six is “to have
a lot on one’s plate”. This means “to be very very busy”. For example, don’t talk to
him about that just yet, he’s got a lot on his plate. Number seven is “an elephant in the room”. This is “a difficult subject”. For example, let’s address
the elephant in the room and discuss the redundancies. Number eight is “a no-brainer”. This means “a logical solution”. For example, the merger is a no-brainer. Our budget will increase ten-fold. Number nine is “to get
back to the drawing board”. This means “to start again”. For example, he doesn’t like the draughts so we need to get back
to the drawing board. And the last business idiom
is number 10, “to reach out”. This means “to contact someone”. For example, I’m going to reach out to the marketing department
and devise a plan. Now I’m going to test you on what you’ve learned from this lesson. I’m going to show you an abbreviation. I’ll give you some time to
think about what it means and then I’ll show you the answer. Let’s get started, number
one, what does this mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) The answer is no big deal, no big deal. Number two, what does this one mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) The answer is the
estimated time of arrival. And how about this one? (clock ticking) (gong banging) These mean year to date or month to date. Number four, what does this one mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) This means a call to action. Number five, what do you
think about this one? (clock ticking) (gong banging) This means business to business. Number six, what does this one mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) This means out of office, out of office. Number seven. (clock ticking) (gong banging) PTO meaning paid time off. Number eight, what does this mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) These mean not safe for
work or safe for work. Number nine, what do you
think about this one? (clock ticking) (gong banging) FYI, for your information,
for your information. And number 10, what does this one mean? (clock ticking) (gong banging) V, this just means very. That was the quiz, how did you do? Make sure you share your scores in the comment section down below. If you missed any, feel free
to skip back and watch again. That’s it for this lesson. I hope you enjoyed it and I
hope you learnt something. Don’t forget to connect with
me on all my social media. I’ve got my Facebook,
I’ve got my Instagram and I’ve got my Twitter. And I shall see you soon
for another lesson, muah. (upbeat music)

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