Manage campus and student workers with Shifts in Microsoft Teams

Manage campus and student workers with Shifts in Microsoft Teams


– [Manny] Hey folks,
thanks for joining me today on today’s virtual session. My name is Manny Sandhu. I am a PM with our Microsoft
Teams engineering group with a focus on education. Today’s session is about managing campus and student workers,
leveraging Microsoft Teams, the Shifts capability. Our agenda today, first
defining what is a shift worker. We’ll deep dive a bit more into Shifts with a short demo as well. We’re gonna introduce what
our firstline worker scenarios are, and then we’ll recap
and provide some resources at the end of it. Just a reminder, this session
is not an introductory to Teams session. My colleague Dominic has created one. It is available on demand
for you at the URL listed on your screen right now. All right, let’s dive in. So, who are shift workers in education? Before I answer that, I’m
gonna take a step back and introduce a term that some of you may or may not have heard, and
that’s called firstline workers. Microsoft has coined the
term firstline workers which represent the groups of individuals who typically first engage customers. They represent the customer’s brand. They see products and services in action, and are generally considered
the heartbeat of the industry. Now, how does that translate in education? There are three buckets, if you will, which shift workers or firstline workers exist in education. The first bucket is your support staff. So, whether you’re a K12,
whether you’re higher education, the transportation workers,
the folks that take our, take the students on either a shuttle or on the bus to school or
between different campuses, security for the institution, if you have some sort of
hospitality or dining halls associated there as a business, those are shift workers,
our shift workers, retail as well as the maintenance crew. In higher education,
it’s generally summed up as the auxiliary workers,
or office of the physical plant type workers. The second major bucket we
have is student workers. So, whether you are an
academic student worker or a non-academic student
worker, so, academic assistant, research assistant, or resident assistant, help desk at a library, or
you work at the dining hall in between classes, those are all examples of student workers who leverage, can leverage the shift capability. And then lastly is if your
institution has healthcare, that is an example of doctors and nurses, orderlies, janitors, custodial staff, maintenance crews, who all would need that capability of Shifts. Let’s take a deeper dive
into the student use case. Student workers are an
extension of firstline workers. They need the same tools to
effectively do their jobs. They need to be able to
communicate with their peers. They need quick access to
documents such as manuals. They need to be able
to access applications like work orders, or incident reports, as well as being able to view upcoming, their upcoming schedules. Microsoft Teams provides this all within a mobile experience. With Shifts, managers can
easily plan shift schedules, manage requests for swaps of time offs. Employees can view their shifts. We offer a Time Clock, which
makes time tracking a snap. Employees can clock in and out
using their mobile devices. Managers can set up optional geolocation or location detection to
detect whether an employee is checking in and out within
the appropriate boundaries. That’s all capable, and then lastly, the Shifts capability has APIs available to integrate into workforce
management systems, so making your existing
investment seamless in working with Microsoft Teams
and the Shifts capability. Expanding a little bit more on Shifts, it’s very important to point
out that the experience on the desktop or the
experience on the mobile device is a near parity experience. So, shift managers can
be able to plan schedules for teams from the desktop
or web application. They can broadcast open
and unfilled shifts. They can accept or deny
time off, or shift changes, from their mobile device on the fly. Now, the employee or the shift
worker can view their shift. They can view requests
for their colleagues to see who wants to, who’s
able to cover their time, or swap shifts around. They’re able to then also determine or set their availability for specific
days or specific hours, which will then feed
into the manager view, allowing them to give
and to set the shifts based on those limitations. Now, each work environment is different. But what’s important is the need to access the right tools and
applications at your fingertips. Using admin provisioning
policies, you can pin specific applications to be
accessed through the mobile device and foster a
better work life balance through custom notifications
and quiet hours. Let’s see this in action. So, from this point of view, this is the manager point of view. I have the capability to go into Shifts, and then I can manage my shift employees, in this case, library employees. I can manage my student workers, as well as any other firstline workers that I may be responsible for. This is particularly powerful
from the point of view of the student, where
there’s only a single tool which allows them to go
manage their classes, as well as their shifts. Now, with the student
view, or the mobile view, you can see that they have
their Science Biology class, as well as their Library Employees Team. That Library Employees
Team then has Shifts. So, you can see at the bottom task bar it allows me to see my
upcoming Assignments as well as my shifts from a singular view. I can see my current shifts. I can click on Open Shifts to see, to request those shifts, and
when I click on an existing shift it allows me to
clock in and clock out. It allows me to define
how long my breaks are, as well as optional geo-fencing, make sure I can only do
this within the campus. That was just a brief
overview of how the Shifts capabilities in Microsoft
Teams can be applied to student workers. Now, let’s shift our focus a little bit and look at the true firstline workers, or the support staff for our institutions. Often an afterthought
in most organizations digital transformation efforts,
the firstline workplace is defined by legacy
tools, manual processes, and fragmented technology experience. So, if you look at bulletin boards, a mixture of walkie
talkies and mobile devices, as well as complex landscapes, that defines how our support
staff generally works at most institutions. This is starting to change. Business leaders are increasingly
looking at this workforce as new ways to operate, more
standardized ways to operate, and bringing them into a, (mumbles), allowing them to leverage
cloud based tools and modern experiences to bring the best out of this audience here. Some of the common challenges
these audience has, if you really look at it
from the institutional side, the institution, there’s
a large communication gap. There’s a large gap between
leadership of an educational institution, as well as
the firstline workers. So, how do we leverage
technology to bridge that gap between the decisions that are made to the folks who are
doing some of the work? The managers in this
space, they have generally a lot of manual processes
around scheduling, task work, paper work,
that take away their time to engage with their team,
to either provide training to them, or deal with any
escalations that they, that they have, and then
if you look at the workers themselves, they tend to
feel that communications are slow to get to them,
they’re ineffective. You know, they feel disconnected
from the institution, when they are actually a
critical part of the institution. Now, if we were to look
at the true definition of a firstline worker which I stated, there’s actually six buckets
that they fall into, right? So, or six pillars in which
technology can transform and support them. We covered very briefly
the shift capability with the student workers. We talked about the
administrative app policy, which gives them a customized view with the right applications pre-pinned right at their fingertips. There are four other ones. One is developing a solution
as Teams, within Teams for the firstline workers,
being able to connect and engage with the firstline workers through announcements and
live events and praises, empowering them to communicate. So, we are bringing them part of a team, as well as contextual information. So, they have the right
information when they need it to be more effective at their jobs. Now, this is a very different concept that folks are not
generally familiar with, but Teams is actually a platform. We have an app store. We encourage our partners
to develop applications in the app store. We also have a number of APIs available which allow institutions to develop their own applications, if
you will, inside of Teams, and there’s a number of
ways that can look like. It can be a tab, it can be a bot, it can be a messaging
extension, a connector, or just something into the activity feed, which enables your line
of business applications to be connected into the Teams platform. Depending on what you’re developing, it’s gonna be different things. If you’re doing incident
management, you know, somebody reports a ticket
that an air conditioning isn’t working somewhere, that may be a bot that pings the individual, and says, hey, this ticket has come in,
you’re the closest person, please acknowledge that you’re
gonna go take care of it. Whether it’s things like incident reports, where you could use things
like adaptive cards, or an incident, they
filed an incident report, they’re able to take pictures
from that incident report, and it automatically files
on the individual’s behalf. Whatever that looks
like, Teams is a platform which enables those types of
line of business applications to come together. Now, I find this stat really
alarming, is, you know, 1.6 hours per week
reviewing company updates. That’s 1.6 hours a week
that’s being taken away from other aspects of their job. So, by enabling a digital
and cloud first platform you’re able to engage and connect those firstline workers within your institution. You can leverage Teams live broadcast for broadcast events. You can leverage the
announcements capability, so it’s really easily
drawing the attention of the firstline worker. We also have what I personally really like is the praise capability. You know, there’s a lot
of statistics around how to engage workers, and
one of the most simplest ones is give them praise. So, whether it be a manager praise, whether it be a peer praise,
having that praise capability and having it shared amongst
the team is a great way to keep employees engaged. Empower communications and collaboration, you’ll notice Teams works
across all platforms, whether you’re using
mobile, whether you’re using a desktop, Apple, a number of browsers. It has a very social feel to it. It allows you to connect with your manager as well as your peers. It allows you to react to messages, not just via text, but also
emojis, or rich (mumbles). If you chose to send a voice
message, take pictures, share your location, do a
number of different use cases, all is that, all of that
is capable within Teams. I have a customer I support,
a very interesting use case, and I didn’t actually help them with this. They ended up coming to me saying this is how we’re using it. They use Teams with their
parking lot attendants. So, every attendant in the
morning picks up a device, logs in, and that is their
team that they are a part of, and each parking lot is their own team within Microsoft Teams. It allows those parking lot
attendants to get messages such as, yes, this individual
with this license plate has called in, don’t give them a ticket. We’re gonna give them
an extra half an hour, so that (mumbles) parking lot
attendant can acknowledge it saying yes, I understand. If there was an incident that
occurred in the parking lot, they take their device, send the location of the incident. They load the incident app
within their mobile device, and then they take
pictures of the incident and log the incident while,
all while being inside of their team. So, that gives them the
power to communicate and acknowledge from dispatch
a message was received. It allows them to very
quickly report an incident, do an incident report,
saving a lot of time, and having that information
then fed directly into the system, the
incident management system. A very great use of technology. Now, we all like to
think we know everything, but reality is we just need
to know where everything is when we need to use it. The workers are the same way. Whether they need to access
manuals or processes, having the files repository
within a team is useful. By clicking on Files,
they can actually see what is the inventory process, what is the process, what
is the onboarding process, what’s the handbook that I need to know so I can quickly review the information, and if they don’t know
exactly where to look they can search for that information. We have contextual, access
to contextual information where if they type in the example handbook it’s gonna show all the
files or messages where handbook was related. Now, how is that applicable? Imagine a simplified onboarding process where you onboard an
individual and they’re very, you know, you give them the tools where they can do searches amongst
the content that’s there to, instead of going back out,
saying, how do I do this, how do I do that, I forgot how to do this. Information at their fingertips, allowing them to be onboarded quicker than it typically would. I’m gonna just leave these
stats up for a second. I think they’re pretty,
they’re pretty alarming, these stats, right? 91% of business leaders
indicate an increase in performance and productivity when these workers are
digitally empowered. 64% of business leaders
indicate a decrease in employee turnover, and
81% of the executives agree (mumbles) between organizations
make them more competitive. These are just some of the use cases that, within students or the
administrative staff within an institution can
use the Shifts capability as well as the broader
firstline worker capability that’s included in Microsoft Teams. Now, as we wrap up our session, there is a couple call
to actions that I have. First, I wanna thank you for joining us. I see there’s been a number
of questions coming through. We’ll do our best to answer
those as quickly as we can. Get started, if you haven’t used Teams, and this is your first
experience with Teams, aka.ms/getteams, start downloading Teams, whether it’s on your mobile
device or on your laptop. We, our organization,
maintains an excellent resource for you to determine, (mumbles)
see how Teams can be used in higher education,
aka.ms/teamsuniversity. We also run regular
webinars for our customers on how different usage
scenarios between staff, students, researchers,
teaching and learning, healthcare, shift workers in this case, and you can find a list of those at aka.ms/teamsedu/webinars. With that, I wanna thank
you again for your time. I hope this was a
insightful session for you around some of the capabilities, the lesser known capabilities,
of Microsoft Teams, in particular with student shift workers, as well as staff firstline workers. Thank you once again.

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