New World of Work- Aligning Education with Employer Needs

New World of Work- Aligning Education with Employer Needs


Speaker 1: I had to learn everything
I wasn’t taught to get here. If I had learned everything about
getting a job, and keeping a job before I was looking for a job, it
would have been so much easier. Paul: How do you prepare yourself to
find a job in today’s job market? Just go to work.com? That’s right, one of the top 70
websites in the United States. Focused on by regularity,
social media, and CrowdSource opinions
from across the world. Speaker 2: Sorry. Paul: We’ve got a lot of
people who work here. It’s an incredibly competitive job
market, and a matter of years 50% of the workforce is going to be
freelance or independent contractors. How does that affect you? Do you think you could be
your own boss right now? Speaker 2: Are you talking to me? Paul: No, we’re doing
a video preparing students for the job market. Speaker 2: Good luck and remember
to treat everything you do like your business, and take
jobs that teach you something. Paul: You know this
isn’t live, right? Speaker 2: Oh. Paul: Are students
under-prepared for what is the most competitive global
job market in history? Yes, we have ranked our opinions
on educators to give students the skills they need, so they
compete at a company like ours. One of the reasons why we’ve built a list of the top 10
soft skills that are important to your
success, which thousands of people have voted on work.com. To learn more about these skills we
turn to the experts in Sacramento. Now we are here. Yes, this is the state
capital of California. This is where Ronald
Reagan was governor. We’re all know Moonbeam,
it’s where Jerry Brown is currently the governor., but
that doesn’t as a matter. What does matter is that having
a formal education in today’s workforce, won’t guarantee you
finding a job in today’s job market. Employers are looking
for more skills. They’re looking for
people who can stand out. What they’re looking for are
the 21st century skills. I sat down with the
California Community College’s vice
chancellor of economic and workforce development, to get the scoop on exactly
what these skills are. What are these 21st-century
employability skills? Vice Chancellor: Well,
Paul the world of work is moving away from
repetitive processes. The skill sets that enable
people to work together more productively have
become much more important. Paul: Okay, given that what role
do you think our education system plays in acting as a bridge between
the students and the workplace? Vice Chancellor: Well, we all start
our careers in the classroom. There is opportunities in the
classroom to build those important skills, but also
in our extracurriculars. Then from then on
into our internships, and then into our actual job experience as we build more advanced versions of those
21st-century skills. Paul: That’s according
to a vice chancellor of one of the largest college
systems in the world. Now, let’s get some more intel about
the New World of Work program from Regina Gil director for the
21st-century Skills Program. The New World of Work has drill down a list of the top 10
employability skills. There’s also a list
at work.com about the best soft skills you
have at your workplace. Anyway, how did you come up
with these skills, and how can you prove that they’ve
actually been proven to work? Regina: What we were doing is we’re
looking at socio-economic research. We wanted to align that
with real feedback. What we did is we hosted a series of skills panels and at
first, we thought we were going to get feedback like,
“You need to have coding skills.” But again and again employers, HR representatives, and
even students themselves were saying they
needed to have those interpersonal and
intrapersonal skills. We synthesized that down into our
top 10 list of 21st century skills. Paul: How do you teach these skills? And how do you verify them? Regina: A lot of times
people will say, “They are just something
that you have.” And the reality is that you
can learn these skills. You can break them down
and you can learn them. What we did is we have a facilitated
approach, where an instructor can teach them integrated into a
class or stand alone as workshops. It’s very interactive, and
so that can help where the students’ learning is in
tandem with the instruction. Paul: How can you verify
everything involved with this? Regina: We’re working with the
Foundation for California Community Colleges to design 10 badges
that go along with our skills. What a student can do is
after they’ve gone through the curriculum, they can actually
try and earn the badge and then an employer can go back into
that badge, and they can verify that the student has displayed
that work in a real setting. Paul: I went to the Folsom
College Campus, took in some of the scenery, made myself at home and
sat down with a few of the students. Speaker 3: I became part of a
program where I was mentoring a young kid like a big-brother
little-brother type deal. When I first started hanging out
with him he wasn’t getting with his homework done, he wasn’t really
hanging out with a lot of other kids. He was keeping to himself a lot. I started working with
him more and more. The more I was able to help
him with the soft skills, the more I noticed that he
opened up a little bit more. He was just overall doing better in
pretty much every aspect of his life. Yes, just really
taught me that social skills are definitely contagious. Speaker 4: I ran for our
clubs and events spot for commissioner, and
people voted for me because they saw that I
was self-aware of my bad parts and my abilities,
and my potential. Through that, it held me
accountable to actually improve myself, and I
was never late again. I ended up developing a bunch of
other soft things along the way. Developing one soft skill allowed
me to get elected, because I was improving myself and so they
saw the potential right there. Speaker 5: The skills I’m learning
now I can transfer that to another part of my life, like I
said I want to be a dermatologist. It’s changed my life, I was
never really a people’ person. Like I said I’ve gotten
really close to other people just through the
club, through CK Club. Speaker 6: All of this
content was created through grant funding, hosted through
the California Community College Chancellor’s
Office, it’s public funds and it should go out to
the public without a fee. That’s something that we feel really
passionate about, is the idea that there shouldn’t be any barriers
to access with this curriculum. It should be done
very collaboratively, so we’re always getting
feedback from the instructors and from the students
who are using it. The idea here really
is to make sure that it doesn’t have any
access limitations. There are a lot of
skills programs that you can get, and they have
a price tag with them. They’re great, but educators
can sign up for this tomorrow and start using it
with their students for free. We don’t want to be yet another
thing that caused a barrier. Paul: A shift changing the
way education and students work together, but who is
leading the shift as a whole? A movement changing the way state employers interact
with higher education. Developing students into not just
learners, but future employees. What can you tell us about the
current partnership between the state as the largest employer in
California, and higher education? And how is the New World of Work
changing that relationship? Speaker 7: With the New World
of Work and the new civil service improvement initiatives
we are going on in the state, we’re seeing a new
focus emerge and that is on developing our future of
civil service workforce. The higher education will be better prepared to prepare
students for public service careers, with
programs such as, New World of Works,
21st-Century Skills. Paul: A Ranker, a site that gets 25
million unique visitors every month. We can see how fast the world
is shifting on a daily basis. It makes sense that the
education and the way the state interacts with
that shift as well. The New World of Work
is helping to lead this, not only for
people looking for a new job, but for people who
are also trying to hire great employees,
like us here at Ranker. To learn more about
those changing ways students prepare for the workforce, and access the free
21st-century-skills videos and lessons, go to
newworldofwork.org.

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