UTas Mental Health Conference March 2016 Case Study – Glenview Community Services

UTas Mental Health Conference March 2016 Case Study – Glenview Community Services


– We now just come to the
last part of this morning which is to talk a little bit about the Employer of Choice Program. Being an Employer of Choice is all about caring for your employees and that then extends into your
colleagues and your clients. It’s about supporting staff
to achieve work/life balance and this is the context that we use within the Employer of Choice network to talk about the various
things that employers do to support their people. It all really now, for us,
is coming under the heading of work/life balance. So it includes concerns around
mental and physical health and other aspects of what goes on in organisations for people. What we’re finding is that
employers supporting their staff to achieve work/life balance
means that those people are more productive and engaged at work and then they’ve got the energy and a positive frame of mind to live a full life when
they’re not at work. So that’s how employers actually
touch the whole community. What we’ve been doing
over the last 6-12 months is working with Employers of Choice to build up some case studies on just enabling us to understand
what work/life balance is. And so with the support of the Australian Institute of Management and WorkSafe Tas, and
Cameron’s been involved, we’ve produced a series of case studies. And what I’d like to do today is I’m going to introduce you to Simon Hyvattinen and Andrea Page from Glenview Community
Services, they’re sitting here. In a moment I’ll ask them to come up and have a bit of a chat but before we do that we’ll have a look at the case study of Glenview
Community Services in the work/life balance context. (upbeat music) – I’ve been here for
nearly twelve months now and been enjoying my particular role in engaging with staff around
where they see things are at in relation to the way that
we would like to deliver our model of care for residents, which we’re calling Residents Choice. It’s about providing residents with a full and meaningful life
through all its stages and how we can achieve that in a very practical everyday sense, not only for the residents
but also in my role encouraging how we can achieve
those same things for workers in the way that they
go about what they do, understanding that we are people first before we are support workers. With my father I found that
he had to have an operation. He’s a diabetic, so that when
he had his big toe amputated, he needed to come and
live with my husband and I for four or five months. Everything he needed, I needed to provide. When I went and said to
my manager about this that I needed more time or
that I might have to retire, I found my manager was understanding. They allowed me to change my hours to suit what I could do or
what I needed to do for my dad but also to maintain my job. So I was very lucky that they
listened, that they cared, and that they provided me
with the help that I needed. After a few months of being in my role I was able to meet the staff
and meet the residents, get the lay of the land and an understanding of what
we were trying to achieve, what we were looking at, what
the vision was for the future. That didn’t need to be a complex thing. It could be something fairly simple and the way we went about it was engaging the staff in conversation, understanding who they were and how they understood their role, and that meaning of what it meant to them
to be a support worker, a lifestyle worker, a carer, a nurse. – When we see a resident that may need a bit of time spent with
them or if they ask, you know, what’s happening, could we sit down and have
a cup of tea with them, we can sit down and not
feel that we’re pressured with tasks that we may need to do. We don’t look at them as tasks. This is part of our daily routine that we’re there for the resident. If their needs are for us to provide them with emotional assistance or with love, I think you would call it, that’s what we provide. – What we talk with quality
here is around identity, so knowing who the person is, getting staff to understand
who the resident is, and having the skills to do that and understanding what
they’ve been good at and having the time to be able to do that. – Within the last six months we’ve made a real focus to
understand our workforce. So we’re developing a workforce plan to capture an understanding
of who our staff are, what skills they have, what
development areas there might be and how we can enhance their
effectiveness to do their role. – When I started working I
thought I might not be enough because I’m not Australian. But I started working at Glenview, I saw so many people from
overseas working with me and I thought, “Oh this is okay.” Because I didn’t have
confidence in my English they started giving us a
tablet, just to use translation, so I said, “Oh I can do it.” So it gives me confidence,
working in Australia, working in this industry. I was very happy that we can
communicate to each other with English and everything
at the staff room. We all came from different countries but speaking in English
and having a conversation. That’s really beneficial for me. – I think what Glenview has tried to do is involve the whole community. We go on walks for
charities, we go on mud runs, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I actually got filthy with
mud and water and was dunked when I went down this great
big slide at the end of it. Lost my sunglasses (laughs)
but I absolutely loved it. I came up spluttering
but I absolutely loved it and I felt that I was part of a team. On the way around, we helped each other, and I think that’s what
it was mainly about. – Here at Glenview one of our phrases that we talk about a lot is journeying together, and
we’re trying to incorporate that into the way we do support for the residents who are our clients, but we’re seeing that from
another perspective now. How we can journey together with our staff to achieve that life balance. (applause) – So I’d like to welcome to the stage the star of the show, Simon, please and Andrea, if you’d just like to come and say a couple of words. Well done, that was great. Let me see whether I need to do that, yep. – Thank you for the opportunity to mention a couple of
things this morning. We’re an aged care facility, both residential and
offering community support to people out in their homes. We’re a 24 hours a day, 7
days a week organisation so it can be tricky, shift work, night shift, was mentioned in some of the slides earlier so you can understand we
have quite an empathy around where we are in terms of understanding where people can be impacted
by the nature of the work or the nature of their shifts. Because we’re working in aged care we’re exposed to people that are frail, death, and dying, and things like that so it’s quite an
emotional space to work in and a highly rewarding
space at the same time. I think one of the major things that we’ve learned along the way is it doesn’t need to be fancy, it doesn’t need to be complex, it doesn’t need to be significant in terms of its elaborateness. It can be just simple, honest, open conversations with staff,
small steps along the way knowing that it’s, like
I’ve mentioned there, we’re journeying together. So we’re working together with the staff to understand where they’re at and being there to
support them along the way with whatever hiccups come along. Like I mentioned, we’re people
first before we’re workers and just taking that into context and realising that poor
performance might not be just an identifier around their skills. It could be other things happening outside in their personal life that’s impacting them at work. I suppose the other key message, if I can (laughs) share my ideas with you is keep your eyes open. Look at the lay of the land, take that moment to step back. I know we can get so busy and we can get so involved in
the things that we need to do and the deadlines, and the
reports, and the audits and all this kind of thing, but step back and have a
good look at your people, look them in the eye and see
how they’re really traveling because some of them
are a little bit scared to actually say that stuff’s going on. Being there, being present
with them, is really important. It’s the same message
that we provide to staff about being present for the
client or for the resident to understand how they’re traveling. We’re saying the same thing, “Hey, we’re willing to listen. “We want to talk to you
about what’s going on for you “and understand where we can support you.” So I thought I’d share that today. – Thank you. I’m just interested to know what prompted you down this track, because usually there’s something that sort of starts a person thinking, “We should do differently,” or, “I’m going to take
a different approach,” so what was it that started
you down this track? – Essentially we are expecting
a lot more of our staff around our model of care so we understood that it’s
a give and take scenario. We need to be offering more support in that same environment to be able to respond
to that appropriately. So that was the main trigger. We do have working groups
around workforce planning and health and well
being and stuff like that so we’ve just ramped that up and just made that a
little bit more visible, a little bit more accessible, and keep the conversation going even if it’s just one or
two minutes in a meeting it’s keeping the conversation alive, that’s what we’re doing. Thank you. – (Audience member) I’m
a professor from the U.S. but I just think you’re great, man. (audience laughs) – That’s alright. (laughs) we’re trying and I think
that’s the main thing. We’re all humans, you know. We understand when someone’s
trying to make a difference for another person, and that’s the attitude
that we’re adopting and I’m not taking all
the conversation but– – No, go for it, Simon. – (Laughs) I think that
makes a difference. People, when they have a genuine sense that you’re trying
genuinely to support them, they’re more open to say, “Well, actually, I’ll have
an earlier conversation,” when things are here rather
than when things get really bad and you’re like, “Oh my goodness, we haven’t
seen them for the last week, “what’s going on?” We can pick things up quicker. – [Audience Member] I think what we see in this industry quite often is the other way around. It’s all about client care and quite often as a support worker they’re so focused and
so committed on their job that looking after their self
comes a fair way down the list so that’s fantastic that
you’ve taken that priority to have that focus on people first and obviously then they
become better support workers from that focus. So congratulations. – Thank you. (applause) – Okay. I just wanted to, that slide
that we’ve got up there, through the work/life balance project and with the support of
Employers of Choice and A.I.M. this is the kind of graphic definition that we’ve developed on work/life balance. So I guess that comes back, really we’ve turned a full circle and we’re now back to what
Tony was really talking about. What can workplaces do, what
is the role of workplaces in the mental health of their people? And having something like this starts to make those connections. Really work, and health, and
family, friends, and community, they’re all connected and employers have got
a really critical role in making sure that
people have that balance and so that’s what we’re
really now trying to promote amongst the Employer of
Choice network, but beyond. I just want to now draw your attention to the fact that the Employer
of Choice Awards are now open and through those awards
the Tasmanian government recognizes organisations that demonstrate contemporary workplace practices and outstanding support for their staff, and that includes opportunities for them to develop work/life balance and also care for their mental health, and we’ve had lots of examples
of Employers of Choice that build that kind of workplace that Simon and Andrea have
been doing at Glenview. There are seventy Employers of Choice and we want to see many more. So if you’re in a workplace
that’s doing a great job, and we know that there’s plenty out there that don’t put their
hand up to be recognized, please encourage your workplace to maybe have a look at the
awards and put in an entry. There’s a card on your table that you can take away with details and we’ll be announcing those awards sort of in the middle of next year. The other thing that I’d like to mention is that, as part of the program, we’ve got a range of
business cluster workshops and we’ve actually got one specifically on mental
health in the workplace, we’ve got Doug Vautier
from OzHelp over here, who delivers one of the cluster programs. They’re three half-day
workshops over four months. We’ve managed to negotiate very
good rates for organisations to participate in those
series of workshops. You don’t have to do them all. You can pick one that matches
the need of your workplace and give it a go. We think that we’ve got some really good, relevant topics there, but in particular for
today, for people here, that one that Doug delivers for OzHelp, there’s also creating a life
balance culture by Nic Steven which is then related back into
the work/life balance work. So those are all on the
Business Tasmania website. Business.tas.gov.au So if you want to have a look there go to the Employer of Choice page and you’ll get a link to
full details and flyers on each of those clusters. There’s an evaluation form on your table. We’d love to get you to
spend a minute or two just letting us know what you’ve felt about
the event this morning. That’d be great because
we always strive to be better next time. I guess that’s wrap, is that right? Yeah, okay. Thank you very much to Angela and Kristy and the team at UTas School
of Business and Economics. Thanks very much to Cameron and the team from WorkSafe Tas. Thank you all and I look forward to
seeing you at the next one, and have a great conference if you’re around for
the next couple of days. Thank you. (applause)

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