Video Production 101: Production Equipment and Space Needed

Video Production 101: Production Equipment and Space Needed


once you have your script and shot list
complete for the pre-production of your video then you can move on to production
production is when you create and gather the assets needed to produce the video
you scripted during pre-production before recording you need to determine
the equipment and space needed to produce high quality video content
there’s a lot to consider here so for details check out whistie as
beginner’s guide to video production in the resources section – often the fear
and uncertainty of equipment keeps businesses from creating video content
but learning to shoot video doesn’t have to be overwhelming let’s review the
equipment you’ll need first to start you need to have a camera it’s likely you
have a great easy to use camera right in your pocket your smartphone most
smartphones may in the last couple of years are at least capable of shooting
high-definition video or HD for short with more premium models frequently
capable of 4k video shooting video shot in 4k have a very sharp image quality
with a horizontal screen resolution of around 4,000 pixels for context 4k video
is a picture with about 8.3 million pixels or about four times as many as
standard HD TV either of these options will work if you’re just getting started
recording with your smart phone is great for filming on the fly or becoming
acclimated with video but at some point you may feel ready to graduate to
something more professional a digital camera that records video you may think
working with a professional digital camera is intimidating but really it’s
not there are four things to keep in mind and when it comes to recording
videos like the one you’re watching now the first thing you want to set is your
frame rate frame rate is the frequency at which frames in a video sequence are
displayed in this case frames per second the most basic customization option when
it comes to frame rate is shooting your video at 24 frames per second or 30
frames per second frames per second is also known as FPS or frames for short
video experts often credit 24 frames with a more cinematic look while 30
frames is more common especially for videos that need to be projected or
broadcasted for the majority of the video you’ll be creating for your bit
I recommend shooting in 30 frames once you’ve set your frame rate in your
camera settings it’s time to determine your aperture shutter speed and ISO be
sure to turn your camera to manual mode to control these settings we’re going to
define each of these individually but know that these three variables are
meant to work in tandem with each other start with adjusting your shutter speed
shutter speed refers to the length of time the camera sensor is exposed to
light think of it as how quickly or slowly the camera blinks we won’t go too
deep into the science of shutter speed but to pick the adequate setting for
recording you’ll have to do a little math first multiply your frame rate by
two so if you’re shooting at 30 frames your shutter speed would be 60 next
adjust your aperture app to refers to the size of the opening in the lens like
a human eye a lens opens and closes to control the amount of light reaching the
sensor aperture is measured in what’s called an f-stop the smaller the f-stop
number the more open the lenses while a larger number means the lens is more
closed so what’s this aperture mean for your video when a lot of light comes
into the camera with a low f-stop number you get a brighter image and a shallower
depth of field this is great for when you want a subject to stand out against
a background like this video when light comes into the camera with a high f-stop
number you get what’s called deep depth of field and are able to maintain focus
across a larger portion of your frame here’s a pro tip let us much natural
light in as possible by setting the aperture to its lowest setting this way
which brings me to my last step you can adjust your ISO to brighten up your shot
ISO simply stands for the International Organization of standardization which is
the main governing body that standardizes sensitivity ratings for
camera sensors among other things ISO measures the camera sensor
sensitivity to light in settings you’ll see the numbers refer to with numbers in
the hundreds or thousands like 200 400 800 and so on the higher the number the
more sensitive your camera is to light the lower the number the less sensitive
ISO also affects the graininess of the image
low ISO is produce a crisp shot while high ISO is create a more noisy grainy
shot when choosing an ISO considered the lighting if your subject is well lit for
example if you were standing outside or using a lighting system you can get by
with a lower ISO ideally around 100 to 200 if you’re indoors in a low light
situation you’ll need to bump up the ISO just be careful of how grainy and makes
your shot if possible make it a best practice to keep our ISO below 400
otherwise your footage will appear grainy as a reminder shutter speed
aperture and ISO work together in tandem for example the digital Nomad tips video
Justin and I produced was shot in 30 frames and because I have to double the
frames to get my shutter speed I recorded with a shutter speed of 60
I had the aperture as low as it would go at 4.5 to get a brighter image with a
shallow depth of field which is why the background is out of focus also we
recorded with a lighting kit so I could keep the ISO low at 300 so that Justin
came in clear and crisp if he was blurry that would provide an ideal learning
experience for you once you have your camera situation figured out you want to
figure out the rest of your equipment you’ll need to get started let’s review
a list of equipment you’ll need to record high quality video content as
well as some best practices on how to set up a space to record first use a
tripod to stabilize your camera it should go without saying but the
handheld method you use for your Instagram story isn’t going to cut it
tripods will ensure that you maintain a steady shot and not break any expensive
equipment in the process second get a lighting kit the traditional setup of
video lights is known as three-point lighting as you might guess it involves
three lights placed strategically around the subject wrapping them in light and
creating appealing shadows on their face to start you’ll need a key light place
this light at a 45 degree angle to the left or right of a subject lift the
light above their head and aim it downwards as the name suggests this is
the key light and should be bright enough that it could be the only light
in the scene if it had to be next place the fill light at a 45 degree angle on
the other side and lift it close to or just above eye level the
the fill is to soften the shadows created by the key but without getting
rid of them completely therefore the fill should be dimmer than
the key light if you have to use the same type of light for both scoot the
fill back and diffuse it by clipping a clear shower curtain onto the clamp
light with clothes pins finally the backlight will add a third layer of
dimension scoot your subject away from the background lift a light above the
subjects head and place it behind them and off to the side so that’s out of the
frame the light should be aimed at the back of their head creating a subtle rim
of light and separating them from the background third record audio with a
separate device once you begin testing out your camera’s video capabilities
you’ll notice that it has an internal microphone to record audio we recommend
only using this audio as a reference for syncing audio from a different source
rather than using it in your final video if you set up your camera at a
reasonable distance from your subject you’ll quickly learn that the internal
microphone isn’t powerful enough to adequately record audio at high quality
instead it you should begin investing in a few pieces of quality sound equipment
Audio is just as important if not more important than the actual footage so
make it a priority and fourth set up your in office studio now that you have
all your equipment you’re finally ready to build your office studio well you
could always use a closet to store your equipment and try and find a dedicated
space to set everything up by having a designated studio you’ll save a lot of
prep time for each shot just make sure the room isn’t too empty if you have to
bring in a couch chairs or blankets to minimize the echoes in the room
speaking of sound pay special attention to the hum of the air conditioning find
a room with minimal noise or turned down the fan during recording consider
purchasing photography paper to create a background that’s more appealing than a
white conference room wall when it comes time to record clear out unnecessary
people from the room and turn off the overhead lights with your three point
lighting setup there will be no need of those harsh fluorescents when and only
when everything is set up call on your talent there’s nothing worse than being
nervous and then having it anxiously watch as lights are turned on in the
camera tested and that’s it an introduction to
equipment in space needed to provide high quality video content you

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