Visual scheduling with Gantt chart for production and batch orders

Visual scheduling with Gantt chart for production and batch orders


In this presentation, I’ll show you how to use the Gantt Chart for visual scheduling for production and batch orders in Dynamics 365 for Finance and Operations. These are the topics I’m going to cover. First, I’ll show you the basic configuration of the chart. Then I’ll dive into the details of doing visual scheduling. Let us take a look at how to configure the Gantt Chart. As an example, I’ll look at two scheduled production orders. I now select the two orders from the production order list page. And, then open the Gantt Chart from the Gantt Chart menu item in the Action Pane. Jobs for the two orders are now loaded to the Gantt Chart. The jobs are assembly jobs, testing jobs, and packing jobs. The chart here is shown in the resource view. In the resource view, each job is grouped under a resource. The alternative to the resource view is the order view. This is the order view. The order view is here shown in a collapsed mode. I can expand the nodes by using the Expand all option. And I now see that each production job belonging to the same production order is grouped under the production order header. This gives a better overview of jobs belonging to the same production order. I now switch back to the resource view. To get a better overview of the jobs belonging to the same order, I can use the Toggle order highlight function. First, I select the job. And, then use the Toggle order highlight function. I can now see that the jobs belonging to the same order appears in a separate color. You can customize the content in the chart from the Content menu. From the content menu, you can load jobs from production orders, from planned production orders, and from project activities. In this case, we’ll only load jobs from production orders. This is indicated by checking the Load production data check box. We’ll also be showing all the 6 different job types that a production operation has. I’ll also enable the option to show material availability in the chart. Now confirming the content. And we can now see that an icon for material availability has appeared in the chart. This indicates that material will be available for the assembly operation before the operations are scheduled to start. Looking at the testing operation. This now has a warning icon. This means that materials will not be ready for this job to start. Materials will be available later as it can be seen here that the material availability icon is placed at the July 21. In the View menu, it can be configured how data is presented in the chart. This is divided on the resource view and order view. The grouping level determines how you want to group your activities in the chart. In the resource view, the default grouping level is the resource. So that is by default marked. You can select to have a more granular grouping level by, for example. checking the order status and order number fields. Doing that will insert columns in the chart and group the jobs per that grouping level. I can also enable Show capacity bar in the chart. And I’ll do that. Now confirming the view mode. I can see that the capacity bar appears above the jobs. The capacity bar is here in the color blue. And that indicates that the resource on which the jobs are scheduled has been booked to its full capacity in the duration of the jobs. We’ll later see how the capacity bar appears in the red color if you overlook a resource. The time interval of the Gantt chart is configured in the Timescale menu. In the Timescale menu, you configure the time unit, in which you want to see the jobs. In this case, we have selected days. Then the increment, in this case, per one day, could also see it per second day. And then we have the From date and the To date. In this case, I’m going to extend the To date. So, I get more space in the Gantt Chart. Now back in the Gantt chat. I can see that I extended the time interval. Let’s now look how to schedule jobs in the Gantt chart. As an example, we would look at the jobs from two production orders for speaker assembly. I select a job and then use the Toggle order highlight function to get a bit overview of jobs from one of the production orders. And, now look at the testing activity or the testing job from this production order. As I can see that this job has a material availability issue. I want to reschedule this job according to its material availability date. I can do that in different ways. And, I’ll show you how to do that first. The first option I have is to select the job and then drag it to the other side of the material availability date. Now you can see that the material , or the warning icon for material shortage disappeared on the testing job. I can always undo the changes I do to my job as long as I don’t save them. I save changes to the chart by using this Save button. or by confirming my changes when I close the chart. And now I undo the scheduling of the testing job by selecting the Undo button. Now I’m back to where I started. And now I want to show the second option I have. Again, I select the job. And, then I have the Schedule job menu. When I select that, a little dialogue opens where I can select between three different scheduling directions from Forward from scheduling date, Backward from scheduling date, or Forward from material availability date. I’m going to select Forward from material availability date and confirm my selection. Now we can see that the job was again scheduled forward from the material availability date. I’ll again undo this. Back again, I’ll show you the last option I have. So, again, I select the job and right-click. And, then a Context menu opens. And here I have different options for doing scheduling of the job. I select the first one Schedule from the material availability. And, the job is again scheduled forward from the material availability date. The next thing I’m going to do is to bring the assembly job and the packing job relative to the testing job. So, the packing job cannot start before the testing job has been completed. So, in order to reschedule the packing job, I can use a function for that. Also, again I have different options. I use the Content menu in this case. And then select Schedule next jobs. As the packing job is the next job to the testing job, it was now rescheduled. Now I also want to schedule the assembly job so it will … it will end when the testing job is about to start. And I use the Content menu. And then I’ll use the Schedule previous job option. And the assembly job was now rescheduled, so it ends when the testing job is starting. Now I’ll also want to schedule the jobs for the second production order. So, I select the testing job and schedule it according to its material availability date using the Content menu. And, the testing job is rescheduled. Now testing the assembly or scheduling the assembly and packing job. I used the Content menu and then select Schedule around job. And, you can now see that by using this function, both jobs were scheduled in the same operation. Now all the jobs have been rescheduled. We can see that the capacity bar for the packing jobs now appears in red in the duration of the packing … packing operation. This is because these are scheduled to start and end at the same time. And they are both scheduled on the same resource. So, we are overbooking the packing resources in this time interval. In order to resolve this the capacity conflict, I can select both of the jobs in the chart. And then use the Context menu again. And then select the Arrange jobs option. Doing that resolves the conflict by rescheduling one of the jobs. The Arrange jobs option can be handy when you have multiple jobs on the same resource and you want to remove gaps and the capacity conflicts. The different options I showed you from the Context menu. You can also find them on the Action Pane. It is possible to reassign a job from run one resource to another resource in the chart. I can, for example, select the assembly job on resource 1211 . And then I can drag it down to resource 1212. I have now done that, but the two assembly jobs are now overbooking resource 1212 in the duration of the assembly jobs. I can now use the rescheduling options to resolve the capacity conflict. And the alternative is to find a free resource and then reschedule one of the assembly jobs to that. I can only reassign the jobs to resources that are in the chart. But, I also had the option to show additional resources that are not loaded to the chart and then find a free resource there, and reassign the jobs to that new resource. I’ll show you an example of that. First I’ll undo the reassignment from 1211 to 1212. I am now back. And then I use the Show additional resource menu. This opens a dialogue with all my available resources. There’s a long list of resources. I can select one or multiple resources in the list. And when I confirm, these resources will be loaded to the chart. As I selected a job in the chart before opening this dialogue, I can also get an indication if there are applicable resources for the job. That means a resource with the same capabilities as a resource I was coming from. In this example, I can see that I only find one applicable resource, which is 1214. So this is a resource that has the same capabilities as the resource 1211. So, this resource I know for sure that it can do the job. I now select this resource and confirm the selection. And now the resource 1214 appears in the chart. And that makes it possible for me to reassign the job from 1211 to 1214 1214. So, I select the… assembly job and drag it down to 1214. Now, I made the reassignment, and I don’t have any capacity conflict, and I’m good to go. This was the end of this demo. I hope you enjoyed it. Thank you very much.

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