Weed seed production

Weed seed production


Then moving on to the giant ragweed
seed production, what we found is that on average, giant ragweed produces about 16 hundred seeds per plant. Those seeds are very
large, so they do not tend to move very far in terms of wind movement or that type of
thing. Giant ragweed produces viable seed at the beginning of September, so it pollinates at the beginning of August. That seed then begins to develop
and really doesn’t develop any viability until around
September. Then once September rolls around, then we do start to see seed shattering off of
those giant ragweed plants. The rate of that seed shattering
does vary quite a bit depending on the year. so between 2012, that seed fell of the plants very
slowly, whereas in 2013, it fell off very
rapidly. In terms of a typical soybean harvest
date, in Minnesota is usually around October 16 on average, so at that point in time in 2012 for instance only about 10
percent of that seed had fallen off the plant at that time whereas in 2013 about half of that seed
would have been off of those plants. That really tells us that depending on the year, a large
proportion of that seed is is actually going through your combine,
especially in soybean with the soybean platform that essentially
funnels that seed into the combine and will spread that seed if it passes
through the combine or end up in the grain, depending on how that combine is set
and the weight of that seed. Some strategies
you might want to think about employing: you might want to think about driving
around any smaller patches of weeds, preventing those weeds from being spread
across the entire field, just allowing those seeds to even drop their seed straight down so
your problem is only confined to a small, maybe three or four foot square area
rather than being in a spread across 30 or 40
feet if it were to be run through your combine. The other thing to keep in mind is
that when we do have the development of these resistant populations, that weed seed can get hung up in inside
that combine and then when you’re moving to different fields you could be
spreading that that resistant giant ragweed seed over long distances and making the problem worse elsewhere as well. However, in agricultural
settings, it is often times found in the fence row areas of the
field. So typically in these fence row areas, if those weeds aren’t controlled, they
grow and produce some seed and that seed doesn’t move very far into the field. However if that seed ends up going through your
combine, that seed does end up being spread across that field and then can become an increasingly
large problem in in the entire field, rather than just
around the the edges or in those fence row areas. In terms of actually managing your fence rows, you could think
about maybe going out there throughout
the summer. You could even if you get delayed into
August, that seed hasn’t been produced so you can think about targeting these fence rows with some sort
of herbicide application or even mowing those fence lines up
until September, when that giant ragweed seed actually
is developing viability. As long as you can wipe those
populations out before that viable seed has been developed, you could use that as a control strategy in these
site specific areas.

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