What Employers Want

What Employers Want


– [Christine] Alright, well good afternoon and welcome to the Career
Development Office’s webinar on what employers want. My name is Christine Kelly. I’m the Director of Career Development. – [Leigh] And I’m Leigh Shroyer. I’m the Employer Relations
and Internship Coordinator for the CDO. – [Christine] So I know that
as a perspective job candidate there’s a lot of things you
wish you knew the answers to and things that employers
would share with you. So today what we’re going to do is give you a little bit
a peek behind the curtain so that you can understand a little bit about what the hiring process is. If you’ve never been on
the other side before, both Leigh and I have experience being on both sides of the table for that, so we’ll share some of the
things that we’ve learned from our experiences and
Leigh’s been out talking to a lot of employers trying to get more information from them
about their hiring processes so that we can bring it back
to you and help you figure out how to be the best
possible candidate you can. We’ll leave some time at
the end for questions also. Alright. So let’s take a look at
some of the topic areas we’re going to cover today. So we’re gonna talk about
some recruiting tools, top skills and attributes employers want, things that employers don’t want, which you think would be obvious but sometimes maybe not. How to engage with employers
throughout the hiring process and then what to do if
you bomb an interview. And I think that’s really
important to understand because just ’cause you
didn’t do well in an interview doesn’t necessarily that you
can’t come back from that, so we’ll talk a little
bit about that as well. So the basics when you’re
applying for any job, you’re gonna have
resumes and cover letters that you’re going to use. And I recently have hired
for four different positions and a couple years ago, I
was on a search committee for another one. I’ve been on a number of search committees and the most important thing that an employer wants to see is that you tailor your
resume and your cover letter to the position description, especially since a lot of thought and a tremendous amount of time often goes into writing a job description, and you’re putting in
there things that would cue a potential employee to what
you’re going to want them to be able to do, so when you’re looking at people’s resumes and cover letters, you’re hoping that they will say something that indicates that they’ve at least read your job description. The ideal is that you hope
that they took it to heart and that they’re mentioning
things in the job description. I know I’ve talked to
a number of recruiters, in your cases, you might have
seen different things too. I’m the kind of person who
will read a cover letter first and then I look at a
resume, and what about you? – [Leigh] Yeah, I always
look at a cover letter first and one thing you have to understand is that these recruiters
are looking through hundreds of cover letters and resumes, so if you’re not tailoring
your cover letter to the job, a lot of times they’re just
gonna completely ignore your application.
– Mhmm. And it’s really easy, even
within an opening paragraph, to know if a person really paid attention to your job description. Sometimes it can be at the end. I remember reading a cover letter that was really, really great at the last institution I worked at. All the way until the last paragraph when she mentioned how excited she’d be to work at the wrong college. So something like that can
immediately get you kicked out of a pool, especially
if attention to detail is one of the criteria
that they’re looking for. And even on my most recent hirings, I had some people who, the cover letter didn’t really address anything that I was looking for or the things that really
weren’t the key things. So do make sure that you do that, because an employer will, again, they’ll look through really quickly, so you probably heard that resumes, people are gonna look at them really fast, so you do need to make sure that the things you’re trying
to highlight for the employer are really obvious, but also
that it’s tweaked a little bit. Now the other two issues is social media. This is something hard to know about. I know personally I make it a point not to look at social media
before I interview candidates and I know that there are legal– – [Leigh] I brought it up
with employers that I meet when I’m out on the field, and they’ve actually told me that, I mean the larger companies
that have organized processes tell me that they specifically
don’t Google people’s names and don’t look up social media
before they give a job offer. However, you’re not always
going to be applying for those companies that
have those processes in mind and the liability for that company, so you may be applying for
somewhere that does do that before they even bring
you in for an interview. – [Christine] Yeah, and some do, so you wanna make sure that
you clean up your social media. So I know it’s always
been the thing in the US before Linkedin that you
never put a photograph on your resume, which in other
countries that’s expected and that you also have
personal information on it, and we don’t do that in the US, but now that LinkedIn
is around, or Facebook, you can find out what somebody
looks like pretty easily, and so it sometimes introduces or has potential to introduce
bias into the hiring process which is why some people won’t look at it and if you’re concerned
about that for yourself, you don’t have to have
an image of your face on your LinkedIn profile when
you’re on the job market. You can put a different image there. I wouldn’t put a cartoon
image or avatar type of thing, but if you have some image
that you think speaks to who you are and what you
can do, your expertise area, that might be something
worth thinking about. But you should make
sure that you go through all your social media platforms and make sure that there isn’t anything that people can see that might
color their impression of you and to be really careful,
especially Twitter. There’s been a couple of cases where people have, during
the hiring process, tweeted something that their
potential employer found less than stellar for
what they were looking for and after that, just
discontinued interacting with that potential employee. So be very careful about
what you say and what you do, what gets out there. – [Leigh] One more thing on the resumes and cover letters too,
is make sure you have an objective person look at it, whether it’s someone you know or bring it to us at the
Career Development Office so we can go over it to look for grammatical
errors, small mistakes. Make sure you’re not the
only person looking at it because you’ve looked at it so many times, you may overlook some easy, small errors. – [Christine] Yeah, and that’s
actually a great thing to do when you’re out building
your strategic relationships and connecting with people and doing informational interviews to bring your resume with you, ask them to take a look at it and see if there’s
anything that they can see right off the bat that
would maybe make you go in the no pile immediately. So definitely input from other people. That’s just gonna help you quite a bit. So again, I’m sure
you’re probably wondering what are the top skills and
attributes employers seek. So before I show this, I just
wanna talk a little bit about some of the recent things
that have been coming up. I mean, obviously the
world of work is changing. There are some jobs that
are being eliminated because there’s not a
need for them anymore, so people are talking about
what’s going to happen during the digital age. I know that after the last recession, a lot of people are thinking man, how do I recession-proof my job? How do ensure that I can
continue to work in my field? And one of the things they
found in doing studies of the things that are
more recession-proof, obviously are jobs that
are harder to automate, and with the increased automation there’s a lot of people,
some people in tech firms saying oh we won’t need
people as much anymore, but there’s another group of
people in the tech industry who are saying it’s going
to increase the need for people who have humanistic skills who can interact with
people, talk to people, who can do big picture
thinking about things. So if you’re thinking about wanting to recession-proof your career, you should work on developing
what I like to call intangible skills and people
call them soft skills, I think that’s diminutive, but intangible. And some of these are in this list. – [Leigh] And believe it or not, I was just listening to
a podcast this morning that says that soft skills have more to do with your career success long-term than your technical skills. – [Christine] That’s true. That’s actually been
around for a long time. I remember back in the
day when I was in college hearing about that, that
people who had technical skills would only go so far, but if
you had the technical skills but really had killer
interpersonal skills, you’d go a lot farther than someone who just
does the technical aspects and a lot of employers have found that it’s actually
easier to teach somebody how to do the technical
aspects of almost any job than it is to teach someone
how to communicate effectively if they don’t know how to do that. But you can see first on the list, creativity and critical thinking, so analytical skills that you might have and one of the things you definitely learn in graduate school is analytical skills. So that should not be a problem, but again, you wanna think about ways that you can demonstrate
in your cover letter, in your resume and even in your interview that you have good analytical skills. Communication skills. Again, this gets broken down into both oral communication skills and written communication skills, and so I have my PhD in communication. I used to teach public
speaking for a long time and one of the things I’ve
noticed in our new phone age, especially with smart phones, is that people text and email a lot and don’t actually like talking to people, so from my perspective,
I think people’s ability to give a presentation is really degraded, and Leigh and I were talking before this about the early days of Power Point when people used to go crazy with all the different
animations you could do. We have a few, we kept it down. But people started to rely on technology in place of their ability
to speak to other people and to actually make a connection and that’s what employers are looking for is people who can do that. And actually, almost
100% of your interview is about the connection
you’re able to make with other human beings. Your interpersonal skills, so being able to get
along with other people, to work effectively with others. I think it’s been long known that 99.9% of your problems in the workplace are gonna have to do with your coworkers and not with the actual tasks of your job. So when people, generally
when they complain, I don’t like my job, what they really mean is
I don’t like my co-workers or I don’t like my boss. ‘Cause usually they enjoy the tasks, they just don’t like the culture for that. So being able to interact
with other people is very, very important. Leadership skills, so being motivated, being able to take
responsibility for things. A lot of employers talk
about wanting to have someone that’s a self-starter, that
can come up with ideas, that can manage themselves and doesn’t need to be micro-managed. And I think most people
would prefer somebody who can do some things,
come to you with some ideas and not have to have constant, ’cause your boss still
has their work to do in addition to managing you. Having a positive attitude. Nobody likes a whiner at work, so the more positive
you can be, the better. I know Leigh must have
had issues with that since you worked in franchise. – [Leigh] Yeah, well we had
a lot of younger workers that didn’t have a lot of experience working under stressful situations. You have to show the
experience in your history, and a lot of employers are gonna ask this during an interview, what
situations have you been in where you’ve had to handle
a situation with conflict or with another team member, or managed conflict between
two other team members that you worked with. So be prepared to show evidence that you have skill with that. – [Christine] And it’ll help you in every other aspect of your life if you learn good conflict
management skills. Team work. So again, being able to
work with other people, and this is one of the things that I know you do a lot
of projects in classes and so you have a lot of opportunity to work as part of a team, but I think that’s something
still as Americans in general, we’re not very good at. I think a lot of times
it’s because we’re taught that the leader’s the most important role, but in order for a team
to work effectively, there are a variety of different roles that people have to play. Sometimes the leader is
the most important role, but not if they exclude everybody else and also there are different
types of leadership, so even connecting to the conflict, the person who’s leading the project, if they’re not good at
conflict management, they need somebody on the team who’s got good interpersonal skills and can take over in a situation where the team’s not
functioning effectively, like maybe when they lost
their motivation or drive to continue with their project. And so think about the
different roles that you play. So a leader is not the one
you should always want to be, ’cause every effective team needs the good people on the bench who can take these other roles that sometimes become really important. – [Leigh] Yeah, even if you are a leader, you’re gonna be on a
team of other leaders, one of the best exercises you
can do with listening skills is called reflection where you listen to what the other person is saying and rephrase it back to them. So what I hear you saying is blank. And it’s a skill that you
really need to work on. I know you all are very brilliant students and I personally always have the mindset that I’m trying to think
of how I’m going to respond to what they’re saying. But that’s not the most important
thing in listening skills. It’s understand their perspective and what they’re saying first before you come up with a solution. – [Christine] Yeah, and that’s
actually effective listening and active listening is
something that will help you in a conflict situation and help you in your
personal relationships too. So learning how to
listen to another person is really important, and in fact, when they do surveys with people and ask about, do you know someone who’s an excellent communicator, and they ask them what skill they use to make that determination,
it’s almost always listening. And then also having
some technical skills, and this varies greatly by the field that you’re going into, but almost everybody needs some sort of technical attention
to detail type of skills. So you might have specific things like knowing particular software programs or you might be really good at writing and I think sometimes
people who are good writers don’t understand and appreciate how valuable a skill that is, ’cause you think, well
everybody can write. Well everyone can write, not well though. So if you’re someone who knows how to write very crisp, very clear prose and you can get your
point across effectively, that’s actually a rare skill and again, I graded hundreds
and hundreds and hundreds of student papers, and I had
to spend time with people telling ’em I had absolutely no idea what you’re saying here. So having good technical
writing skills is important. So those are the skill sets
employers are looking for. Depending on the employers
and the particular position, there will be other skills. What I wanna point out is that people tend to make broad statements on resumes. Oftentimes, I have excellent written and interpersonal skills. And that tells me immediately
that no you don’t. Because you need to give
me evidence that you do. Like, everyone says they have
good interpersonal skills and good communication skills, even people with bad communication skills. So don’t just write that
you have good skills, think of ways that you can demonstrate, or think of ways while you’re here at CGE to build those skills up
by giving presentations, working on group projects
effectively and making friends. – [Leigh] A lot of the interviews
that you will go through are called behavioral interviews, so what you wanna think of is situations, specific situations you’ve been in that demonstrate each one of these skills. How you interacted in that situation, what the results were. – [Christine] Yeah, excellent. Alright, so what employers don’t want. These should be obvious things. A lack of curiosity or a lack of knowledge about the company and its products. The number one complaint
we hear from people who interview potential candidates is when they ask a question
about what do you know about our organization, that they don’t get a good response, that people don’t know enough. In fact, Google is one of the places that gets hundreds of
thousands applications ’cause everybody wants to
work at Google, ’cause why? I can play foosball,
foosball and get free food. But you really have to know, you can’t respond to that question by, oh I know all kinds of
things about Google. I Google all the time. So you really have to go in depth and not just look at
what’s on their website, but really know what’s going on. Apathy or lack of passion, and that can be communicated through the way that you present yourself. Again, not only in your letter. If you write a letter that’s a generic, general cover letter, that
shows just a lack of interest and apathy towards the position. Like, I need a job and
I’m just gonna apply for a bunch and not really care. And same when you interview that you can communicate that in your tone when you’re
answering questions or body language or other things. – [Leigh] And I have a
great example of that, one interview, out of all the years and hundreds of interviews I did, really stuck out in my mind. The guy showed up late and sat
down, never made eye contact, I got the feeling he was angry. That interview went about five minutes and I said, thank you,
we’ll be getting back to you as soon as possible. People can tell, the body
language is very obvious. – [Christine] Maybe his mom
made him go to the interview. – [Leigh] Exactly. (laughing) – [Christine] Alright, dishonesty. So any distorted
information on your resume, and this is a hard one. I heard a number of years
ago from a recruiter who said that the general rule of thumb in HR is about 10% of everybody’s
resume is a bold faced lie. Which I thought, well
that doesn’t seem fair, because you could have had some
really phenomenal experience that’s an outlier to
everything else you’ve done. But it’s true, you did do
that, it’s not made up. But you wanna be very careful. So I’ve seen this on some
people’s resumes here where you do a class project and you work with an organization and that it’s phrased as consultant for, like I saw somebody that
consulted for Disney. If you’re doing a class project,
you might be using Disney, but you’re not a consultant for Disney. So you wanna be careful
about how you present the work that you’ve done so
that employers don’t think that you are exaggerating
what you’ve done, ’cause that could be a problem – [Leigh] Yeah, if your project
has an impact on the company that is something very good
you wanna put on there, that this was just a class project, but the company took your recommendations and actually implemented them. – [Christine] Okay,
you have inconsistency, so gaps in employment. Employers hate that and so if
you’re coming out of school, it’s not really a problem, ’cause they know where you’ve
been so that explains the gap, but as you go through in your career, you wanna be very careful of
that and try to manage those. I’ve had a couple of times myself, I’ve had six month gaps
and that’s not horrid. It’s when you get to the
year, two year, three year that people start wondering
what’s wrong with you. So be careful of gaps or other things. Or having jobs for less
than a year or two. If you move around a lot and you’re changing jobs every year, or every six or nine months, an employers gonna look at that and think, why would I want
to take a risk on this person, ’cause from what I’ve heard, it costs the company
about 18 months in time to recoup the costs of hiring, onboarding and training you. So if you leave in six
months or even a year, they’ve lost money on that and potentially it’s kinda put them back. – [Leigh] And I’ve had
to explain both of those on my resume and as you
grow in your career, I worked for one company that
was just not a fit for me and I ended up being laid
off from that position but I was high enough up the ladder that that type of position
was hard to find going on but you have to be able
to explain those gaps in your employment and understand that they’re gonna see
them and wonder about them. – [Christine] Selfishness. So anything that indicates, so again, if you’re in an interview and you’re talking about
a time that you worked as part of a team and all
you say is me, me, me, and I, that’s gonna indicate to them that you are not a sharing individual and that’s not going to go over well. Or laziness, lack of initiative. So that’s why it’s important
while you’re in school to do things besides just go to class so that you can show that
you’ve taken an interest in some other things and that you’ve actually taken on projects or other types of things to indicate that you’re not going to be a person who’s going to just phone it in ’cause nobody wants that either. In fact, all of you have at
minimum a ninety day window to prove yourself and
sometimes it’s a little longer, Leigh’s got six months. So you better be good
for a whole six months and then afterwards. (laughing) But you wanna make sure that
you make a good impression, that you don’t come off as lazy. So oftentimes we think
we’re at a disadvantage and the employer holds all the cards and we, as a potential
employee, don’t have any power in the relationship and
that’s not necessarily true. In fact, we talk a lot about
how you can create your own job and engage employers and get
what you want and you need. You don’t always even have to wait for there to be a job posting. Sometimes you can create an opportunity by being a person who’s out there and working with engaging
employers and trying to connect. So there are things that you
should do before you apply. – [Leigh] Yeah, one of
the things you should do is know the value of the position
that you’re applying for, and there are tools to do that. Most companies are not going to list how much they’re going to pay for a certain position beforehand, but there are a few online
resources you can go to. You can go to Glassdoor, although that doesn’t have
super specific information, that’s just reported by
people that work there, so that may be a low end or the high end. – [Christine] And you hope
they’re telling the truth. (laughing) – [Leigh] Yeah, and it’s
possible they’re not, but there’s other resources
like Payscale.com. O*Net OnLine is very
specific and salary.com, and they’re all free to
use to a specific extent. Unless you’re looking to be
a recruiter or something, you can do your own investigation
on how much they’re worth and Glassdoor is also
a really good resource for you to look at to
see what other people think of working at that organization. You have to take it with a grain of salt because a lot of times the people that have
negative things to say are gonna show up more than the people that have
positive things to say about that organization. – [Christine] Yeah and even read. I actually worked with a
student a couple years ago who was worried about a
place where he got an offer and he sent me some
things that were comments from former employees
and when I looked at it it was two years old, but then I looked up
the company on Glassdoor and noticed that almost that same comment over a time span of two years, so I’m thinking that probably is a problem with that organization. And so, again, when you look, what are other people saying about it. But that also might help you
find out some information on things to do to prepare
to apply for the job, to do research and know
more about the organization so you can really indicate your interest. – [Leigh] And then if you
have any questions about it because salary negotiations are not easy, but at those salary negotiations are gonna set you up for success
in the rest of your career, where you start determines
how you’re gonna grow and where you’re gonna end up. That’s one thing that research has shown that one of the possible reasons that women have a lower salary than men do is because they don’t negotiate
as much at the beginning. If you can do that and set yourself up better in the beginning, it’ll help you throughout your career. – [Christine] And we’ll do a
webinar on that in the future, and an in-person workshop actually. Okay, so after you submit an application, there are things that you could do. So first would be to be patient. The hiring process always takes longer than you think it should. Even the research they’ve done on the average length of time from actually doing an in-person interview to getting an offer or finding out if you didn’t
get the job is 23 days, so that’s three weeks of
sitting around waiting to hear. It doesn’t always take that
long but sometimes it does. Or, I’m in higher ed. Higher ed.’s notoriously slow, so when you’re applying for faculty jobs, you apply for them in the fall and most of the deadlines are
from September, early October, but a lot of times you don’t hear anything until well, December, January, February. So there’s a lot of waiting. – [Leigh] Sometimes with
unprofessional organizations, you will not hear back at all, and larger organizations, like
I have personal experience with Disney, takes three
months to get back to you on an answer. – [Christine] But you know, it’s okay after a couple of weeks to reach out to the person. Now that’s only if you have
a person’s email address. [email protected] is not worth your time. No one responds to that email. But if you actually contacted a recruiter before you applied or you know someone in the organization, after
you submitted your application wait a couple weeks and it’s
okay to follow up and see. I actually did that on
a job I applied for, my first one, actually,
as a career consultant. A few years back I’d applied for one job and I got a phone call that
there was a similar job that was going to be opening up soon and so to be on the lookout for it. I kept looking and looking and looking, and about two and a half
weeks later I hadn’t seen it, so I sent an email to the
person who contacted me and said I was just wondering
when that might be posted, and it was actually posted later that week and she called me back. But you know, sometimes
it’s okay to follow up. Things to do after an interview. This is the number one
thing that you can do to either improve your
chances of getting the job or kill them. If you want to get the
job, send a thank you note after the interview almost immediately. Within 24 hours or less
ideally to do that. People took time out of their day to interview you for a position and maybe a lot of time out of your day. Some organizations there, some are short, you’re only there for an hour, but other organizations have
half-day or day-long interviews and so you really want to, again, reinforce your commitment
and be polite and kind by sending a thank you note. And we hear from a lot of recruiters that people just don’t do that, and actually a lot of hiring managers that people just don’t
send thank you notes. And you can make an extra impact by sending them a handwritten one, but I’d send an email one first ’cause you don’t know how long it’ll take to get the handwritten one,
and that can take a long time. – [Leigh] And if it’s a big office, you might not be sure that
they’re actually gonna get it. They’ll get the email,
but the handwritten note is a good personal touch. – [Christine] And that’s, again, a place where, let’s
say there was something you wanted to say in the
interview that you forgot, you can kind of throw that in there, or do something to kind
of reinforce your interest that after the interview,
you’re even more excited about an opportunity to join their team. So start building that relationship. During the offer phase,
this is a challenging one, so again if you haven’t negotiated before, it’s kind of scary and
can be intimidating. It doesn’t have to be, but
you really wanna think about how you’re going to approach the offer. I usually suggest to people not to accept an offer right away, ’cause you need a little
bit of time to think, to figure out what
you’re actually offered. Generally those come
through in a phone call. Sometimes companies though,
they email that to you with all the details, but if
you’re getting a phone call, you’re gonna be excited and nervous and you’re not necessarily
writing everything down, so before you say yes, you
wanna make sure that you know what you’re agreeing to. Once you say yes, there’s no negotiating, so say it’s very interesting and you look forward
to getting back to them after you’ve had time
to consider the offer. If it comes over the phone, ask them to send you something in writing. But this is a place where
you really need to be careful and think about the language
that you use, how you ask, and how you interact with
them during this time, because, again, this is your
first interaction with them as a co-worker, so think carefully, and again, we’ll talk strategies in a different webinar
about how to do that. – [Leigh] And again, I want to emphasize how important it is to do your research before you go to probably
a second or third interview because if you don’t know
how much to talk about and they do ask you what you
were thinking for salary range, if they throw something out there, they’re providing the anchor, so it makes it harder to negotiate. Research has shown if you’re the first one to put out the salary,
that’s providing the anchor for negotiating from. So you wanna be the one to put the higher anchor point out there. – [Christine] And then I’ve
heard from a lot of recruiters that they actually do and
will coach people sometimes on kind of expectations around
that, so you have an idea. So even if you ask too high, I actually work with some students who, when that question came up, they were a little higher
than what the role paid and the recruiter or
the hiring manager says oh that’s a little bit higher than what we pay for this position. So they also wanna make sure that by the time they make an offer, that you’re going to be able to come to some sort of agreement. But it is weird that during an interview, you’re not allowed to ask about salary, but they feel no qualms about asking you how much you expect to make. So that’s why you don’t want to go into that situation unprepared, so what are you gonna do? – [Leigh] At least now there’s options to research it before you go in. When Christine and I started, there wasn’t much available to us except other people that
worked in that position. – [Christine] Although back in the day, I remember when I was in
high school in civics class, we actually had to find a job
that had a salary listed in it so they used to publish them. But that was a long time ago. – [Leigh] It’s a lot easier now. You can use the Google. – [Christine] Yeah, but
if you do work at a state or government job, a
lot of times the salary is posted, so in higher
ed. oftentimes it is, at public institutions, not at private, so that you have an idea,
and for non-profits, it’s somewhat easy to
research and find out, if you wanna know what the role pays by just calling them and asking them. – [Leigh] Yeah and that
goes to another issue too. If you are applying for
something in government, those are fixed bands. They’re not gonna move those. Other companies, if your skills are more than a lot of the other
people that are applying for that position, they
may be willing to adjust a little bit, but government
organizations can’t. – [Christine] So here’s some of the things that a recruiter will not share with you. They’re not gonna tell
you in advance oftentimes what the salary, what the highest
salary is for the position so they wanna leave themselves
some negotiating room. Usually, and I say usually
’cause it’s not always true, that the offer that you
get is slightly lower than what they’re willing to pay. And that’s not always the case because sometimes people do come in with their best and final offer. Or they’re limited, like
the job I had before this, the salary was posted
in the job announcement, that was all they paid and
there was no negotiating. So sometimes that does happen. But they’re not gonna tell you how much they’re willing
to pay for the position, so don’t expect them to. They will not tell you how many candidates are in the process. And actually, I don’t
think this really matters, because I’ve had people,
well how do I know if I’m one or two or three. It doesn’t really matter. You need to go in there
and present your best self, and even if you knew who
your competition was, it’s not necessarily going to help you, ’cause you don’t know that person, you don’t know what their skill sets are, or even if you did know the person, it doesn’t really help you, ’cause it’s not like you can say, well don’t hire Julie, she’s a flake. So they’re not gonna tell you. – [Leigh] And that question
also shows a lack of confidence because if you’re wondering if there’s one or two other candidates, it shows that you’re not
going to be competitive. If there’s 10 candidates,
it shouldn’t really matter, you should feel you’re the
best person for that job. – [Christine] Mhmm, yeah. And I know it’s not easy to hear, but sometimes you just aren’t a fit, and there’s a hole, but
that’s a hard one to nail down because it means a bunch
of different things. It could be there’s
just not a skills match or maybe your skills are not at the point or developed to the point
where they need them to be, or sometimes it’s just a personality fit. I think all of us know
when we leave an interview if there was something weird there and if you were feeling
like, oh I don’t know, they were probably feeling the same thing. So I always use the dating
analogy, ’cause it really is. Sometimes you go on a date
with someone and it’s okay, but you don’t really need to
see them again after that. It’s the same thing when
you go for an interview. Sometimes it’s just not a love connection. – [Leigh] And a lot of times, they’re not gonna share with you the reasons that you weren’t hired. – [Christine] Yeah, I’ve had
people ask me all the time, well can I ask them, can I
call and ask what I did wrong during the interview? I’m like no, ’cause
they’re not gonna tell you what you did wrong. – [Leigh] No and it doesn’t really have anything to do with you,
it’s the liability part of it. – [Christine] Right. Well and then sometimes like let’s say someone could tell you,
you did this wrong. That might be something
that was wrong for them, that question, that answer
at that particular time, but it might not be wrong in general. In fact, I wrote an article
in Inside Higher Ed. called After The Failed
Interview, you should all read it. It talks a little bit about that. But also a hiring team
sometimes doesn’t really know what they need. If you see a position that
stays open for a long time or closes and then opens
and closes and opens, closes and opens, it tells you the person making the hiring decision doesn’t really know what they want, is having a hard time figuring that out. And sometimes people will post positions before they really know what they want or there might be disagreement, or sometimes it could be, and I’ve had this happen to people before, especially in faculty job processes, that a job gets posted, they apply for it, they get part way into it, and then the funding for
the position gets pulled. And that can happen in any area, that if the company’s got a bad quarter, like okay, we’re gonna put
a freeze on hiring right now so anybody that you talk
to, they’re just gone. And they might not call you back and say hey, we can’t hire you because we need the money.
– Or anybody, you know. – [Christine] Alright so let’s say you went on the interview,
you did your best and it just didn’t work out for you. You might cry on your way
home, or scream in your car, whatever the case happens to be, but it doesn’t necessarily
mean that all is lost, particularly if this is an organization that you really wanna work for. I mean, sometimes things
don’t go your way. Everybody has a time when they
had the right, perfect answer on the tip of their tongue
and it just kinda flies out, or other things that happened, or somebody asks you a question and you just hadn’t really
thought about that before and you just don’t click. But if you are working
through a recruiter, or even if it’s just the hiring
manager that you worked with be honest, send the thank
you note for their time and in there just a brief explanation that I know today I was not on my best. I know I can do better and
ask for another opportunity to have a conversation with them. And if they liked you on paper and through the process they liked you during the phone screen or Skype screen or whatever kinda screen you’re gonna have before you actually go to
the in-person interview, there’s always the chance
that they’re as disappointed that it didn’t work out as you are and that they might be open to
having a longer conversation with you and maybe giving
you another chance. Let’s say you bombed a question where you were supposed to
be talking about something that you know how to do, you might be able to share
examples of your work. In fact, I always think it’s a good idea when you’re going into an interview to bring some things
with you as visual aids. So if you have something you’ve done that you’re very proud of, that sometimes helps,
especially if you’re nervous, it takes some of the attention off you. But things to show and tell
as you’re going through. Let’s say you didn’t do
that during your interview. Maybe you have something
that you could attach onto the email. Again, nothing really long
and don’t write an email that makes them scroll
down the page a lot, but just a brief thank
you again for your time. I know I wasn’t on my best
performance at this point but I know I could do better, so please let’s have another
conversation about this. And you never know. It could, or maybe that position
it doesn’t work out for, but at least you have set yourself up so that if you apply again, they know that you are a stand-up person, that you took responsibility for something that didn’t go the way
you had wanted it to, that you were an adult and
professional, mature about it and those are things that people
value and they’ll remember. And even when you think
of the recruiting role, recruiters move around. They don’t always stay at the same company and sometimes they end up
in different positions. So you never know when a recruiter that you made an impact on or even a hiring manager
that you made an impact on maybe reaches out to
you again in the future to say hey, I have this opportunity or this might be a good thing for you. They’ll remember you. So that’s a good thing to think about. So other secrets, the
job is yours to lose. So once you get to that interview stage, everyone wants you to be successful and they want you to be
stellar in your interview. Nobody wants to see you
fail, so think about that. Employers do wanna like you
as a person and so again, that’s what the whole
interview process is about. When I look at your things on paper, I can tell whether or not you
have the skill sets I need for you to be able to do the job, but then the question I’m trying to answer during the interview is do I want to spend eight or more hours of my day
in close proximity to you? Is that going to be fun for me or am I going to hate you
at the end of the day? So it really is about
that personality fit. Appearance does matter, and this used to be easier
now to figure out what to wear to an interview than it is today because it used to be you wore a suit. – [Leigh] You can do some research too. It’s really easy now to
look at an organization, look at their social media postings, look at what they have on their website, pictures of their team members when they’re working in the organization. I can tell you though, if you
underdress for an interview, it really looks bad on you. I was a district manager
for a franchise organization for years and I have many
times had people come in in flip-flops and jeans to my interviews and I realized they were
only hourly positions. However, if that person is, I felt disrespected honestly, when people came in dressed like that. So do some research and dress
like the job you wanna have. – [Christine] And actually
a good tip for doing this is you should go out, if possible, to the place where
you’re going to interview the day before at
approximately the same time so you know what traffic
patterns are going to be like, how long is it going to
take you to be there, ’cause you want to be there
early, but not too early. We’ll talk about that in
the interview workshop. You can see how people are
dressed coming in and coming out, and that will give you an idea. Do a notch above what
you see people wearing. But also this is a good question
you can ask a recruiter. What’s the dress code for this particular, and it’s a good thing to ask ’cause I had a colleague
a couple years ago who interviewed at Paxon and she was gonna interview with the VP and so fortunately she knew someone in the organization
and was talking to her, said I’m gonna go out and buy a suit. The person’s like oh no, don’t, ’cause she wears jeans
and t-shirts every day. You’d be overdressed. And then when she got the job, she found out it wasn’t just any jeans, it was really expensive
jeans, it was Seven, For All Mankind, and that stuff. Again, facts worth savings.
– And that’s how you’re gonna rely on your
strategic relationships too. Ask somebody within the
company how they dress normally and how people go dressed for interviews. – [Christine] And then
you can be too eager. No one likes desperation. And even if you think you’re masking it, you’re probably not. And even if they don’t
know exactly what it is, they’ll know you have some weird vibe that they don’t wanna
have anything to do with. So don’t be too over
the top in your passion and eagerness to fulfill that role. And again, the timing isn’t always fair. Sometimes things don’t work
out how you like them too. Things take longer as I imagine, or you might end up, and
I’ve worked with people in situations where they get an offer from a company that they like
but isn’t their number one while they’re waiting to hear
from their number one company and then have to figure
out how do I manage that so that I don’t end up unemployed? So sometimes there are other
challenges that you might face in going through this process. – [Leigh] Going back to the
eagerness for the role, too, everybody is nervous about
going to an interview, so it’s a really good
idea to take advantage of the resources at the
Career Development Office, do mock interviews so
there’s one less thing to be nervous about when you’re going in. ‘Cause you’re gonna be
eager to get that position, but if you’re nervous
added on top of eager, it’s really gonna accelerate things, make things look worse. – [Christine] Yeah, definitely. Alright so that’s all we have for the secrets of
interacting with employers, so now we’re gonna share with you the secrets of interacting with us. So we hope that you will come
by for one-on-one coaching, and these are the coaching
sessions that we do, so building strategic relationships, which we also have a webinar on, career exploration and planning, for those of you that
are trying to figure out how to plan for a life after CGU, interview preparation and mock interviews, job and internship search, negotiation, document review, and then anything else career development related
that you can think of that’s not in the list. You could pick other and then write in what you want to talk about
or what you wanna work on. So that’s sometimes where people come in for LinkedIn reviews or other
things along those lines. So you can definitely engage
with us on one-on-one coaching. Online we have a platform
called Big Interview which allows you to practice
your interviewing skills. It has a lot of little
videos on interview tips and strategies and so
you could look at that. Our YouTube channel we have
webinars we’ve done in the past, we have short little
clips we call Career Bites and so look at our YouTube channel and see what you can learn from that. We have a blog that’s in the
CDO media on our portal page, and we do have a Facebook page too, so you can like us on Facebook and every Monday I post a career
development-relate article. We do workshops and
webinars and our events, we’re starting to have more
employers come to campus and so we’re working on some
of those for the future. – [Leigh] And no matter
what those employers are coming out to do
specifically on campus, they’re actually looking to do recruiting. That’s the reason they come to campus is to meet students, get to know them, and get to know what talents they have. So even if it’s a case interview, hopefully I’m doing with
one of the consulting firms, come meet the people that are there. Even though you may not be interested in doing something in the case interview. – [Christine] So again, different ways that you can engage with us, our Facebook, Handshake. You should all fill out
your profile in Handshake so it’s complete, and our YouTube channel. So what you can see on your screen now is our upcoming events. So if you are a humanist, on Thursday I will be in the IAC Building from four to five talking
about careers for humanists. On December 6, we have
a wellness coordinator who’s going to come to CGU
and talk about her career path and what she does as a
wellness coordinator. Acing your Interview webinar,
that’ll be on December 7. So well give you all the
secrets of interviewing, and that’s noon to one. And then we’ve decided
that during finals week, we’re going to do Career Cram. So you do not need an appointment. We’ll be open, our hours 8:30 to 5, and ready to help you with
anything you need help with. So as you’re trying to recoup from finals, pop in, say hello, ask us
questions about your career to clear your brain out. We also have coffee and snacks
so feel free to just pop in and see our space, say hi to us, let us get to know you
and have some snacks. Thanks again for joining us and we hope to see you
in the CDO really soon. – [Leigh] Thank you.

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